Zauber Editions

Zauber editions specialise in reviving literary works from the past.
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William Cowper (1731-1800) spent the creative years of his life at Olney, and later at nearby Weston Underwood in North Buckingham-shire. Although he had written poetry ear;ier in his life, he was 50 years old when he began to apply himself seriouisly to his art. His poetry was well-received and he became much admired in his day and his celebrat-ed blank verse poem, The Task, set down an important marker for poets of the next generation.
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William Cowper (1731-1800) spent the creative years of his life at Olney, and later at nearby Weston Underwood in North Buckingham-shire. He became much admired in his day and his celebrated blank verse poem, The Task, set down an important marker for poets of the next generation.
During his life he corresponded frequently with his many friends and much of that correspondence was collected and published by Thomas Shuttleworth Grimshaw in 1849. These letters are presented in a new edition in this volume.
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Charlotte Turner Smith (1749-1807) was an 18th Century poet and novelist who achieved success in her day. Her popularity was mainly due to her ‘gothic’ novels, but her lasting fame comes mainly from her poetry. She was admired by Wordsworth for her revival of the sonnet and in the 1790s became a friend of the poet William Cowper. The revolutionary impact of Wordsworth and Coleridge at the beginning of the 19th century somewhat dimmed interest in the late 18th century poets, who in some respects laid the groundwork for the Romantic poets. Charlotte Smith’s poems are very accomplished and worth the attention of all poetry readers. This edition of her poetry is designed to bring her to modern attention.
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This sprawling work from the fluent pen of S T Coleridge was first published in 1817. It began as a preface to a collected volume of his poems, but grew to become a literary autobiog-raphy. Coleridge's philosophical views gain prominence in this work, which also has several chapters on William Wordsworth's theory of poetry. Wordsworth believed that the language of ordinary speech was a proper vehicle for poetry and Coleridge departs from this view.
Coleridge held to the concept of genius, which he believed could transcend mere talent, although the boundary between the two was no more than that between "an egg and an egg-shell".
He was much influenced by German philosophers, Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling in particular, and he presents many of their ideas in this work.
Finally, Coleridge adds much to the development of literary criticism and the critical concept of the “willing suspension of disbelief” derives from this book.
The original publication was printed in two volumes. This paperback edition is a single volume.